Below are five (5) favorites from the past month - they are personal favorites, including a couple of portraits. Each was captured with the wonderful Fujifilm X-Pro1. I've included a few words about each image. The portability of the Fuji system allows me to carry all three primes with me a lot of the time, and the below shots show images with each: 60mm, 35mm, and 18mm. Comments, discussion, questions strongly encouraged!

This is a scene I've returned to several times in the past weeks. In fact, I created a PANO of the scene here, on my Tumblr site. The image was made with the 60mm lens at 1/250s in full manual mode. I chose the 60mm lens so I didn't have to stand in traffic! 

This is a scene I've returned to several times in the past weeks. In fact, I created a PANO of the scene here, on my Tumblr site. The image was made with the 60mm lens at 1/250s in full manual mode. I chose the 60mm lens so I didn't have to stand in traffic! 

I've been slowly working on a project creating a "portrait" of my office parking garage. There's a bunch of antennas that present some interesting opportunities, but are just a little too "random." However, when I added the Exit sign, it created a more pleasing composition. More from my on-going study of this subject on my Tumblr blog, OnlyAPicture, (Probably now on second page).

I've been slowly working on a project creating a "portrait" of my office parking garage. There's a bunch of antennas that present some interesting opportunities, but are just a little too "random." However, when I added the Exit sign, it created a more pleasing composition. More from my on-going study of this subject on my Tumblr blog, OnlyAPicture, (Probably now on second page).

Another image from the Parking Structure study. Lately, I've really been fascinated by the tire marks here. There's a beauty to them. An emptiness, too. And, they are in the spirit of my of my images that are without people, but show clear evidence that someone was once here - the story is for the viewer. (See just below for perhaps my favorite of the tire mark shots...so far). 18mm, f/5.6, 1/125. Manual mode.

Another image from the Parking Structure study. Lately, I've really been fascinated by the tire marks here. There's a beauty to them. An emptiness, too. And, they are in the spirit of my of my images that are without people, but show clear evidence that someone was once here - the story is for the viewer. (See just below for perhaps my favorite of the tire mark shots...so far). 18mm, f/5.6, 1/125. Manual mode.

Basically, the only "people" pictures I tend to take are of our beautiful daughters. This one of Gretha is a particular favorite because it does what most successful people pictures do - capture the feeling of the moment. This image was taken July 4th, and it just says "Americana" to me (she's making chalk art, by the way...I wish I captured that, too. You can see the concentration of an artist on her face). Fuji 35mm wide open.

Basically, the only "people" pictures I tend to take are of our beautiful daughters. This one of Gretha is a particular favorite because it does what most successful people pictures do - capture the feeling of the moment. This image was taken July 4th, and it just says "Americana" to me (she's making chalk art, by the way...I wish I captured that, too. You can see the concentration of an artist on her face). Fuji 35mm wide open.

Okay, this I think is my favorite in a while. Again, it captures the emotions at that time. A sun-drenched kitchen. Gretha in her usual morning weekend position in the kitchen: eating and watching TV. And, Cody (now 6 months), resting under the table. It captures a memory I will have for a long time. Fuji 60mm, f/2.8 at 1/250. Manual mode.

Okay, this I think is my favorite in a while. Again, it captures the emotions at that time. A sun-drenched kitchen. Gretha in her usual morning weekend position in the kitchen: eating and watching TV. And, Cody (now 6 months), resting under the table. It captures a memory I will have for a long time. Fuji 60mm, f/2.8 at 1/250. Manual mode.

Posted
AuthorJeff Seltzer